The News Courier in Athens, Alabama

Lifestyle

December 15, 2012

10 healthful baking tips for the holidays

This time of year, your calendar is likely to be full of holiday parties, office gatherings, cookie exchanges and family meals.

The common theme of any of these events is delicious desserts, which are usually loaded with added sugars and unhealthy fats.

Take control this holiday season, and experiment with these healthful baking tips to benefit yourself and your loved ones.

The U.S. Agriculture Department labels solid fats and added sugars as empty calories, and recommends that these make up no more than 15 percent of your diet. However, most Americans consume about 35 percent of their calories from these empty calorie sources.

What are solid fats?

Solid fats are fats that are solid at room temperature (i.e. butter and shortening). Most are high in saturated fats or trans fats, which tend to raise "bad" LDL cholesterol levels and increase the risk for heart disease.

What are added sugars?

According to the USDA, added sugars are sugars and syrups that are added to foods or beverages when they are processed or prepared. This includes white granulated sugar, brown sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, raw sugar, honey and maple syrup. This does not include naturally occurring sugars such as those in milk and fruits.

So, the overall goal for healthful baking is to reduce the empty calories from added sugars and solid fats and replace them with more healthful ingredients. Besides, most recipes call for more sugar and fat than are actually needed for decadent flavor. To preserve the flavor of your recipes, the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends reducing the sugar and fat by 25 percent to 33 percent.

Healthful baking tips

1. When reducing sugar in your recipes, be sure to add spices for flavor. Try cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, cardamom, vanilla bean or pumpkin pie spice.

2. Instead of solid fats such as butter and shortening, go for vegetable oils such as canola oil for less saturated and trans fat. Even better, unsweetened applesauce can replace half the oil in your recipe to help cut down on overall fat. The applesauce also adds natural sweetness and fiber. Canned pumpkin or sweet potato puree can also be used as a substitute for these solid fats while also offering health benefits from vitamins A and C.

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