The News Courier in Athens, Alabama

State and Nation

February 14, 2013

General Motors posts $898M 4Q net profit



DETROIT (AP) — General Motors made money in North America and Asia and lost a bundle in Europe as it nearly doubled last year's fourth-quarter net profit.

But the numbers were complicated by a dizzying array of accounting gains and losses for tax credits and devaluation of European assets.

The biggest U.S. automaker reported net income of $898 million, or 54 cents per share, compared with $468 million, or 28 cents per share, a year earlier. Revenue grew 3 percent to $39.3 billion.

The fourth-quarter profit included billions in one-time accounting gains and losses that ended up being a $100 million increase. Without the gain, the company earned 48 cents per share, falling short of Wall Street's expectations. Analysts polled by FactSet expected earnings of 51 cents.

Its shares rose 4 cents to $28.71 in premarket trading.

During the quarter, GM continued its recent pattern of making money in the U.S. and Asia but posting big losses in Europe as the economy there continues to cut into auto sales. GM made $1.4 billion pretax in North America, which was down $102 million from last year. But losses widened in Europe as the company has predicted, to $699 million. GM's International Operations, which include China and the rest of Asia, earned $473 million. The company made $99 million in South America and $146 million on its financial unit.

For the full year, GM earned $4.9 billion, or $2.92 per share. That was down from $7.6 billion, or $4.58 per share, in 2011. The difference was largely due to one-time items. Excluding those, GM made $2.60 per share last year. Revenue for the year rose 1 percent to $152.3 billion. The 2012 earnings also fell short of Wall Street expectations. Analysts predicted $3.23 per share on revenue of $151.1 billion.

In the fourth quarter, GM returned roughly $35 billion in U.S. and Canadian tax credits to its books. Under accounting rules, the company must book the credits because it's likely to use them to offset income taxes. GM has been solidly in the black for three years. But the gain largely was offset by removal of goodwill, devaluation of assets in Europe, the cost of shifting its white-collar pension plan to an insurance company annuity and the cost of buying back $5.5 billion worth of shares from the U.S. government.

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