Blackberries

Because there are so many blackberry varieties, gardeners should spend a bit of time researching which cultivated variety, or cultivar, of blackberry is best for a specific location.

 

Interested in planting blackberries? Choosing the best blackberry varieties for the backyard garden will require a little homework. Because there are so many blackberry varieties, gardeners should spend a bit of time researching which cultivated variety, or cultivar, of blackberry is best for a specific location. Chip East, an Alabama Extension commercial horticulture regional agent, offers some tips on selecting cultivars and proper planting conditions.

Blackberry cultivars

Blackberries cultivars come in three major types—erect, semi-erect or trailing. Semi-erect and trailing cultivars require a trellis. In contrast, erect blackberry types stand independently, but planting on a trellis in home gardens minimizes wind damage to the canes.

Next growers must choose between plants with thorns or those without.

“Thorny plants offer an aggressive growth habit and more disease resistance, and therefore can be very productive,” said East.

Popular thorny, erect blackberry cultivars include ‘Chickasaw,’ ‘Choctaw,’ ‘Kiowa’ and ‘Shawnee.’ Popular erect cultivars without thorns include ‘Apache,’ ‘Arapaho,’ ‘Natchez,’ ‘Navajo’ and ‘Ouachita.’

East said there can be significant differences in the fruit size and overall production between different cultivars. It may depend on the use of the berry as to what cultivar to choose.

Planting conditions

Plant blackberries in late winter or spring of the year. While early spring planting is best, do not plant until the soil is dry enough to work. Prepare the planting area with the same care as for a vegetable seedbed.

Blackberries need planting areas with good drainage and full sunlight.

Blackberries grow and produce satisfactorily on a wide range of soil types, from sandy to heavy clay loams, provided that the drainage is good. Good soils for blackberry production are deep sandy loams that are moderately fertile, high in organic matter, easily worked and well drained.

Consider the possibility of winter injury when selecting planting locations. Blackberry plants often begin blooming before frost danger passes.

“Planting on slopes, or on the tops of slopes, allows cold air to drain away from the plants,” said East.

Blackberries planted on a southern slope are likely to bloom earlier than those on northern slopes. If possible, avoid planting blackberries in low-lying areas. Because air settles in low areas, blackberries planted there would be most affected by cold injury during bloom.

“While a grower might be able to do something if they confronted with this problem, freezing temperatures during bloom are always a concern,” said East.

— For information on topics related to the home and garden, contact any ACES office. The Limestone County Office is at 1109 W. Market St., Athens. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. For more information, visit www.aces.edu or call 256-232-5510.

 

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