Brittany Howard - Stay High

Brittany Howard portrays a singing grocery store employee in her new video, “Stay High,” which features several scenes from downtown Athens and actor Terry Crews in a leading role.

Limestone County native Brittany Howard released her new single, “Stay High,” this morning with an accompanying video featuring actor Terry Crews.

The video was shot at various locations around “her hometown” and Decatur, according to a tweet from Howard. Those who watch the video would easily recognize various spots around Athens, including Hometown Market and Dub's, both on Jefferson Street, and Kreme Delite on Washington Street.

The video features Crews, a former NFL player and actor, driving in a pickup truck and lip syncing to Howard's song. Howard is seen at different points throughout the video, including as a grocery store employee and dancing with friends at Kreme Delite.

Those involved in the video shoot, which took place the weekend of June 8-9, were sworn to secrecy. The business owners would only confirm they participated.

Dub's Burgers owner Derek Pirtle confirmed the pair were at his restaurant.

“They were here, and it was a lot of fun,” Pirtle told The News Courier last month.

Pirtle said everyone was extremely personable to be such big talents.

Pirtle said they spent some time at the location and seemed to enjoy themselves. He said Howard even talked about eating at Dub's Burgers as a child.

“It was a great time,” Pirtle said.

Solo project

“Stay High” is the second song shared from Howard's new solo album, “Jaime.” The album is named for Howard's sister, who died of cancer when they were both in their teens. Howard released the first single, “History Repeats,” last month.

The solo project signals a hiatus for Alabama Shakes, which also features members from the Athens-Limestone area. Alabama Shakes bassist Zac Cockrell plays on “Jaime” and will tour with Howard to support the album.

In an interview with Rolling Stone last month, Howard said she didn't know what the future held for the band.

“We’re a family,” she told Rolling Stone's Patrick Doyle. “Those are my bro-bros for life. But right now they’re just letting me do my thing. If I did the same songs and the same everything, I’d be so miserable. I’d be so bored. I wouldn’t care about heaps of cash, swimming in a cash swimming pool. It does not matter to me.”