Take responsibility

Dear Editor:

Personal responsibility, that’s what’s lacking today. Everyone has a body and a brain. It is their responsibility to take care of that body to strengthen, not weaken it, and they are responsible for developing their brain to accomplish their goals. Today, the nation spends close to a trillion dollars on programs to assist people who have become addicted to drugs, alcohol, and sweets, among other weaknesses, and need the rest of society to provide for them and their families. High school dropout young women having multiple illegitimate births, young men dropping out of school and unable to obtain employment turning to crime. The public and the taxpayers must foot the bill for their lack of responsibility.

Various social agencies provide benefits to some people at taxpayer expense, that taxpayers can’t even afford for themselves. Family Resource Center is a good example of duplication of activities that other social agencies can or should provide. It’s just another unnecessary cost to the already burdened taxpayer. Most cities and states have closed these centers or they have merged with other agencies due to elimination of public funding. Athens should be no different.

Councilmen (Jimmy) Gill and (Harold) Wales are correct that the city must reduce their allocations to various organizations. Athens can no longer allocate public funds to everyone who wants or has received it in the past. These requests should fully detail and justify their financial expenditures and explain, in depth, the unique need for their services to be considered for a funding allocation.

The city should require community service of recipients of public funds and those guilty of traffic violations. This is only fair, as taxpayers have to work and contribute to society along with funding for people needing these items who don’t otherwise contribute to society. Picking up the litter cluttering up our city is one item that could be achieved by requiring community service.

Sincerely,

Quentin D. Anderson Sr.

Athens

House, Senate problem

Dear Editor:

Well here we are, trillions of dollars in debt as a result of: We have three unfunded wars (and could find a couple of more without much trouble); we provide billions of dollars in foreign aid to second, and third world countries (who would love to see our down fall).

We have become the moral, legal, protective watchdog and try to be the ethical/religious leader of the world (and we pay for all it). We provide huge government bailouts to cover the unconscionable and illegal acts and actions of Wall Street brokers, commercial banks, car company mismanagement, and unscrupulous financiers, etc.

We allow corporations to send jobs out of the country as well send money overseas to avoid paying taxes. We are the free arms broker to the world, the world piggy bank (with no hope of repayment), have an extremely bloated federal bureaucracy providing double redundant programs, and we provide services to an ever growing and uncontrolled population of illegal aliens.

We also have a health care and pharmaceutical industry that just keeps jacking up their prices and also does a very good job of belling up to the public trough, via Medicare, Medicaid and the prescription drug program, too many special interest groups, and last, but not least, we have a an aging general population that is greedy, not willing to save for retirement, and willing to pass on our current financial problems and future debt burden to our children.

What would I do is what I have never heard come from of our “leaders” in Washington D.C., including Democrats, Republicans, and tea party members. First I would either raise taxes to pay for the unfunded wars or just get out, (and stay out of the next ones). I would stop being the world’s piggy bank, its watchdog, arms dealer, bailout king, and its social service and welfare agency.

I would tighten up and control the entitlement programs, redundant federal programs, force efficiencies and downsize through out the federal bureaucracy. And yes my countrymen, as we have the lowest tax rate since the 1950s, I would increase income taxes across the board to the point of paying for what we receive.  We will all have to pay up for a period of time, until the country is on the right track again. If we don’t the consequences of failure are unimaginable.

In my opinion, at the heart of the problem is the U.S. House and Senate (plus the past and present presidents) who have no real true skin in the game. They won’t make hard decisions for political and personal reasons and have done or accomplished little of nothing of consequence to resolve our nation’s issues.

Sincerely,

Ralph Diggins

Athens

Get priorities in order

Dear Editor:

I have been an Athens resident now for 10 years and for most of that time some committed citizens have been working hard toward a new library. At first all seemed well, we were moving forward by buying the old Kroger building and funds and pledges were coming in. Then we had a change in leadership and it has literally been a yo-yo as to what is going to happen.

I saw the article in the paper today (April 13) about signage for our town and I agree we need that, but at what cost and what about other bids?

There would be no better advertising than to see the Kroger building renovated into a new library. A library says to all who comes through this city “We care about our citizens, the education of our youth and we are a city that is well educated and continues to learn.”

I just do not understand the mayor. He wants to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars to renovate the top floor of a building so 15 employees can stay there until he builds a new city hall. He states the old city hall has mold and the door does not close properly? Has anyone been down there lately? The place is still an attractive building and with minor renovations could work well for 15 employees.

How is that we never heard Mayor Williams complain about the building? Perhaps Mayor Williams felt it was more important to build something for the citizens like a library than an edifice to himself.

I read Mr. Marks was going to have a “State of the City” luncheon. I didn’t go because I did not have $15 or $500 to spend and to be honest, I really wonder with some of the ideas he has had, if he really knows the state of the economy or the state of our city’s real need.

It seems if he wants to get elected the next time, he would do things for his constituents rather than himself.

Let’s get our priorities straight.

Sincerely,

Dorothy Posey

Athens

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